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Author Topic: Fubar 2  (Read 877 times)
vwhelmot
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Posts: 589


« on: November 28, 2017, 12:47:21 PM »

I suppose you can call this part two of the rebuild. I will post up a lot more content early next year but for now I will show some of the stuff I have been getting on with . Tinware , especially aftermarket stuff has always been hit and miss. The tinware fitted to the motor when I bought it was mostly Scat stuff to which I adapted some original vw cylinder shrouds and other pieces. This time round I`ve mostly kept what was there apart from the front breast plate. The fan housing was in good shape but had holes drilled into it for the Berg linkage and the coil mount and as I`m not using that linkage anymore they had to be welded up etc. The seam on the back was next to go, half way round I did wonder why I was doing this but it looks nice and clean now. 

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

It did take a while to keep it flat

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Next was the cylinder tins. I hate how the factory just folded over the edge and spot welded the three pieces together so I cut them up and welded them back together creating a nice smooth edge.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I did buy a set of Danny Gabbards end pieces but to be honest when I saw them I thought I could just mod mine to a similar style.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I made the lip flow the whole way around like this

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr


By this time I had tacked the pieces together. I had to wait a while to finish these as my motor was still away at Bishops racing engines being built.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

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vwhelmot
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« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2017, 12:59:43 PM »

Making the oil cooler shroud fit without any gaps has been a challenge. Cut and welded the curve at the top and the flange.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I`m fitting the thermostat flaps back into the shroud, locked in the open position as it directs the air to the right place. I lightened them quite a bit .

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Here you can see that I`ve made a little tunnel for the plug wires to go through without touching the case

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr
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baz
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« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2017, 21:12:23 PM »

Top class work as usual. Loving the tinware mods  Cool
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karl h
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2017, 07:55:14 AM »

love to watch your work, keep the pics coming!
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glassback kid
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« Reply #4 on: December 01, 2017, 14:54:59 PM »

Excellent great to see updates, once again great workmanship, looking forward to more
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sonic
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« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2017, 15:06:46 PM »

Nice , aftermarket parts do have a lot to desire  Smiley

Rgs
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vwhelmot
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« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2017, 17:09:27 PM »

There is a LOT of aftermarket parts available that are complete rubbish from panels to rubber to fixings to just about every aspect of the ingredients!  The amount of stuff I`ve bought twice because it was not up to scratch is unreal. Some of it wasn't cheap either.  I will update soon , still trying to sort my Flickr account and trying to retrieve photos from Photobucket.
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vwhelmot
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« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2017, 11:29:21 AM »

Random stuff
 Rear axle bearing housing, I pressed out the axle tube which was a job in itself so I could detail the housing. Lots of hand filing and sanding and a little bit of lightening.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

People don't realise how much time stupid thing like this takes. Hours and hours of work and its a bearing housing of all things. Since the final picture was taken I repainted them as I wasn't happy about the finish
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vwhelmot
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« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2017, 11:56:25 AM »

Pedals. I will admit to copying Dude with his idea of rose jointing the throttle linkage, so all monies will be past onto him Grin.

The throttle pedal hinge was something I had made seventeen years ago for the first resto. I then thought it was a good idea to drill the floor pan and bolt the pedal through it but for this time that wasn't going to happen. I kept the hinge as it worked and is a lot more solid than the standard vw item which not only looks gash but is a bit agricultural too.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The stop plate was part of the original design

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The pedals as they were

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I love the look of drilled pedals

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Yes ive heard that drilling them makes them weaker but I`m not really planning on driving it much anyway  Grin

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Lots of smoothing went on.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The brake pedal plunger pivot was very worn so I made a new one and pressed it in.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Drilled the plunger too

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Trial fitted. I had to do something with the throttle shaft stop. Vw just crimped it to stop the shaft being pushed too deep into the tube. That wasn't good enough so I modified it with a welded washer

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The mounting plate was later modified too

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The floor pan had this pressing for the original throttle pedal so I had to cut it out to make the area flat.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Cleaned up the hinge and modified it slightly

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Welded on from underneath

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Drilled some more holes

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I used two male rose joints and machined up an aluminium adjuster so theoretically its different to Dudes set up  Grin

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Again, hours and hours into this but I think it was worth it for the look.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr
« Last Edit: December 04, 2017, 11:58:14 AM by vwhelmot » Logged
nicolas
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« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2017, 20:48:21 PM »

you say that it takes hours, but the way i see it it takes hours to make it very nice, i would have done it in minutes, making scrap  Grin
very nice work!
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vwhelmot
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« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2017, 11:20:59 AM »

 Grin

Steering box.   The box that was on the car when I bought it back was the same TSW one that I had installed in the first restoration way back and to be honest was still in useable condition but there was one problem..... it was a TSW one. The search went on for a genuine VW box and after a fair amount of on line searching I found one. It looked tatty on the outside but actually felt slop free when turning the input shaft. The worm gears were in absolutely superb condition as were the bearing surfaces. So many of these in the past were worn out, especially the ball race surface but this one is like new.  The casting is really rough , even on the genuine VW ones so there was loads of hand tool smoothing to be done.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Hot tip, leave the old seals in place to act a paint mask

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Blasted

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

More hand smoothing

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

It had a strange cast near the bottom which served no purpose only to look ugly so I smoothed it round to match the rest of it.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

High build primed, I masked off the VW logo too.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

First coat of black metalflake

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Flatted

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

New seals installed

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

The input shaft was rusty and its made from heat treated extra hard steel so I had to spin it on the lathe and linish it with a belt sander to super fine grades to polish it up , then seal it with metal sealer afterwards.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Going back together

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Chrome going on

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I had the cap chromed and then painted the deep recesses black after.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

I changed the brass bolts for polished stainless after this.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Chromed Pitman arm after lots of smoothing etc.

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

Bottom clamp beautified

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

It got painted the same black metalflake too

Untitled by lyndon creamer, on Flickr

So that's the steering box nearly done. Onto the next
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brewsy
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« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2017, 12:04:51 PM »

Beautiful!

Did you remember which way round the clamp goes though? There's a 13 and 14 marking (which you probably polished off  Wink )
Bentley will tell you which is which but ones for Beetle and ones for KG.

Cheers
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vwhelmot
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« Reply #12 on: December 06, 2017, 12:31:37 PM »

Haha I knew there was a difference, this is definitely a bug one, I compared it to a couple of other scrap ones I had.
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baz
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« Reply #13 on: December 06, 2017, 15:42:11 PM »

Same clamp on kg and bug, the slots on side that locate on the dimple on beam gives correct steering box angle, goes one way for bug and other way for kg.

Not that you look like you need any help  Wink unless you've made the slots even each side  Cheesy
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Andrew
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« Reply #14 on: December 06, 2017, 18:33:38 PM »

One word, "Amazing"
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brewsy
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« Reply #15 on: December 07, 2017, 16:55:12 PM »

Here you go...
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 16:56:44 PM by brewsy » Logged
vwhelmot
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« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2017, 09:25:36 AM »

Not needed , I should have welded the notches up  Angry
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Neil Davies
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« Reply #17 on: December 08, 2017, 12:57:27 PM »

Same clamp on kg and bug, the slots on side that locate on the dimple on beam gives correct steering box angle, goes one way for bug and other way for kg.

Not that you look like you need any help  Wink unless you've made the slots even each side  Cheesy

Every day's a school day! I didn't know that and I've had (and changed steering boxes on) both!
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2007cc, 48IDFs, street car. 14.45@93 on pump fuel, treads, muffler and fanbelt. October 2017!
brewsy
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« Reply #18 on: December 08, 2017, 13:16:06 PM »


Every day's a school day! I didn't know that and I've had (and changed steering boxes on) both!

Sorry to hijack Helm..
Neil I recently bought the Bentley after years of just having the Haynes (and hearing all the Samba peeps quote it as the bible) and reading it through gives LOADs of insight into our old cars..
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